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FY 2013 Request for Defense Science and Technology Programs

Richard M. Jones
Number 24 - February 15, 2012  |  Search FYI  |   FYI Archives  |   Subscribe to FYI

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A document provided by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy entitled “Innovation for America’s Economy, America’s Energy, and American Skills” explains:

“The 2013 Budget invests in the Department of Defense’s (DOD) long-term scientific and technological innovation to ensure that the Nation has access to the best defense systems in the world. The Budget proposes $71.2 billion for DOD R&D, a $1.5 billion decrease from the 2012 funding level, including $11.9 billion for early-stage science and technology programs (S&T).

“The Budget proposes $2.8 billion for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) for its support of longer-term breakthrough research. The 2013 Budget sustains DOD’s basic research (“6.1”) with a record commitment of $2.1 billion for research in high-priority areas such as cybersecurity, robotics, advanced learning, information access, cleaner and more efficient energy, and biodefense. DOD-funded research provides future affordable options for new defense systems and helps the Nation avoid technological surprise by potential adversaries. The 2013 Budget expands DOD’s support of advanced manufacturing R&D by establishing public-private partnerships in targeted technologies.”

Page 81 of the “Fiscal Year 2013 Budget of the U.S. Government” states:

“Funds Research and Development for the Military of the Future. The Administration will continue its strong commitment to funding the Nation’s long-term scientific and technical needs, including those for national security. Accordingly, the Budget proposes $69.4 billion for research, development, test, and evaluation, including $11.9 billion for early-stage science and technology programs, focusing our efforts on those projects most likely to enhance our capability to respond to new threats. The Budget invests in the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency and department-wide basic research slightly above the 2012 enacted levels. Such investments will allow the Nation to explore diverse scientific principles and technological applications, including bio-defense, cybersecurity, information access, and cleaner and more efficient energy use, robotics, and advanced computing.

“Funding in this area will also capitalize on the role that DOD plays in advanced manufacturing by establishing a number of public-private partnerships in targeted technologies to expedite their development and production. DOD-funded research provides future options for new defense systems, helps the Nation avoid a technological surprise by potential adversaries, results in cost savings by solving technical problems early in the life cycle of acquisition programs, and takes advantage of emerging technical opportunities. The funding proposed in the Budget will be awarded through competitive processes, with experts guiding the choices of research topics to be undertaken, and reviewing and selecting projects for funding based on proposals submitted by universities, non-profit organizations, for-profit companies, and Government laboratories.”

Defense Budget Priorities and Choices” provides further insight into the Defense Department’s perspective on science and technology:

“The Department believes that accelerating trends in both technology development and a dynamic threat environment dictate that we must maintain our edge by protecting our investments in development of future capabilities. As such, science and technology programs are largely protected within this budget.”

The Office of the Under Secretary of Defense (Comptroller) provides detailed numbers, but no explanatory text, in a 180-page document entitled  “RDT&E Programs (R-1).”  The below figures are taken from this document:

Total 6.1 Basic Research:

FY 2012 funding is $2,112.4 million
The FY 2013 request is $2,116.9 million, an increase of $4.5 million or 0.2 percent

Total 6.2 Applied Research:

FY 2012 funding is $4,739.3 million
The FY 2013 request is $4,478.0 million, a decrease of $261.3 million or 5.5 percent

Total 6.3 Advanced Technology Development:

FY 2012 funding is $5,411.3 million
The FY 2013 request is $5,266.3 million, a decrease of $145.0 million or 2.7 percent

Total Army 6.1, 6.2, and 6.3:

FY 2012 funding is $2,535.8 million
The FY 2013 request is $2,209.5 million, a decrease of $326.3 million or 12.9 percent

Total Navy 6.1, 6.2, and 6.3:

FY 2012 funding is $2,120.4 million
The FY 2013 request is $1,979.7 million, a decrease of $140.7 million or 6.6 percent

Total Air Force 6.1, 6.2, and 6.3:

FY 2012 funding is $2,435.7 million
The FY 2013 request is $2,221.8 million, a decrease of $213.9 million or 8.8 percent

Total Defense-Wide (i.e., DARPA)  6.1, 6.2, and 6.3:

FY 2012 funding is $5,171.2 million
The FY 2013 request is $5,450.0 million, an increase of $278.8 million or 5.4 percent

Richard M. Jones
Government Relations Division
American Institute of Physics
rjones@aip.org
301-209-3095