H. Frederick Dylla Director's Matters

Fine fellows
For almost 20 years, AIP has sponsored science fellows, bringing highly qualified, motivated individuals from the physical sciences community to Washington, DC, to learn about and contribute to the development of national public policy. AIP's science fellowship program has many objectives: Congressional Science Fellows serve to inform Congress, infuse scientific and technical expertise in the policymaking process, and advocate for science throughout all areas of public policy; US State Department Fellows serve to contribute scientific and technical expertise to the State Department and raise awareness of the value of scientific input. The selection committee recently announced its picks for the 2009-10 class of AIP science fellows: Jeffrey Fox, Marcos Huerta and Matthew Sharp.

Fellows on Capitol Hill have made important policy contributions to many areas such as science agency funding, energy, environment, homeland security, education and the workforce, and technology transfer. Current congressional fellows were heavily involved in drafting the 2009 stimulus bill; one also helped develop a system to track appropriations. Other former fellows made significant contributions to the America COMPETES Act. Thanks to increased support from the Acoustical Society of America (ASA) and AVS, AIP was recently able to expand our Congressional fellows program from one fellow to two.

Jeffrey Fox Jeffrey Fox has been named the AIP–ASA Congressional Science Fellow. Fox holds a PhD in physics from Cornell University, has experience working at a biotechnology start-up company, and is currently a visiting scientist at Cornell's Center for Applied Mathematics. With a background in complex systems, industry, small business, and interdisciplinary science, Fox has the experience to effectively communicate science concepts in many ways.

Marcos Huerta Marcos Huerta was awarded the AIP–AVS Congressional Science Fellowship. Huerta brings scientific expertise and experience in local and national political action. He received his PhD in astrophysics from Rice University and currently serves as a public-policy fellow in Washington, DC. Huerta expresses passion for science outreach and believes that sharing scientific discoveries with the public is vital—both for securing popular support for the funding of scientific research and for increasing the country's scientific literacy.

Matthew Sharp Matthew Sharp, a PhD physicist from the University of Chicago, has been selected the AIP US State Department Fellow. Sharp is trained in the use of technology and quantitative analysis to unravel the secrets of the largest and smallest structures in the universe, and currently works as a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government, focusing on the role that technology can play in verifying compliance with a disarmament treaty. The American Astronomical Society supports this fellowship with an annual contribution. As luck would have it, Sharp is a proud member of AAS.

The strong Member Society involvement in this program has definitely added value, in addition to work force. Other Member Societies, namely the American Physical Society, the American Geophysical Union, and the Optical Society of America, run their own science fellowship programs. Together, AIP and our supporting Member Societies are providing motivated individuals with opportunities to enhance their careers while making the voice of science stronger in Washington.

Sincerely,
Fred

Integrated workflow for EPAPS
At the beginning of May, a new enhanced workflow was introduced for author deposits to EPAPS—AIP's Electronic Physics Auxiliary Publication Service—a depository for published papers' supplementary material. The workflow was introduced for Applied Physics Letters and will soon be available on a broader basis. The new process simplifies handling of incoming files and streamlines the process for authors submitting manuscripts through Peer X-Press. Requirements for deposit forms and readme.txt files have been eliminated. The EPAPS files will be processed concurrently with the manuscript files throughout the review and production processes and automatically posted online. Linking EPAPS material from the reference section of a manuscript will also be improved; users will be able to click directly to the article's abstract view, and supplementary files will be available for immediate download. Even better … EPAPS deposits are free of charge. More information may be found at the EPAPS homepage.

A bumper crop of SPS interns
interns Twelve Society of Physics Students (SPS) National Interns arrived in the Washington, DC, area last week—the largest group in the program's nine-year history. They are working through August 5 with several organizations: SPS, the AIP History Center, the American Physical Society (APS), NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and the Materials Research Science and Engineering Center (MRSEC) at the University of Maryland. Several are conducting scientific research; others are working in education and outreach. You might recognize two gluttons for excellence in the photos below—Mary Mills and Daniel McNeel participated in the program last summer as well. You are invited to read the interns' introductions posted on the SPS website and to return often to read their weekly journals about their summer experiences.

ACP-based interns doing education/outreach:
Raina Khatri
Raina Khatri
Hope College
APS Physics-to-Go
Mary Mills
Mary Mills
College of Wooster
SPS SOCK/AIP History Ctr.
Scott Stacy
Scott Stacy
Texas Christian Univ.
SPS/ComPADRE (IYA)
Erica Watkins
Erica Watkins
Chicago State Univ.
MRSEC/SPS SOCK
Leslie Watkins
Leslie Watkins
North Carolina State Univ.
APS PhysicsQuest
NASA interns doing scientific research:
Erin Balsamo
Erin Balsamo
McDaniel College
Jose Castellano
Jose Castellano
New Mexico State Univ.
Ian Dougherty
Ian Dougherty
Rowan Univ.
Daniel McNeel
Daniel McNeel
New Mexico State Univ.
Brian Tennyson
Brian Tennyson
St. Mary's College of MD
NIST interns doing scientific research:
Brad Dinardo
Brad Dinardo
Juniata College
Laurie Stephey
Laurie Stephey
Rollins College
 

 

Did anyone say "picnic"?
On Tuesday, June 9, ACP will express its appreciation for its employees by hosting an employee picnic from noon to 2pm for all the societies in the building. If you forgot to RSVP, contact the ACP Events Committee. Come join the fun and indulge in some great food and games.

AIP's Publishing Center in Melville will also host an employee appreciation event this summer. Stay tuned for more details.

Who we are—Production Operations' Team 1
Last week in this column, we gave an overview of AIP Production Operations, which is responsible for taking articles from the manuscript stage through publication, both print and online. The entire operation is responsible for over 100 journals, and production is spread among four talented teams, cross-trained in XML, Photoshop, Speedflow, and Xyvision.

Team 1, led by Barbara Carbonaro, produces nearly 400 issues a year, spread among 49 journals. Team 1 (see the organizational chart, page 33) handles publications from customers including the American Society of Civil Engineers, ASTM International, Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers, AVS, and the American Astronomical Society. It also produces AIP's Applied Physics Letters, the largest scientific journal in the world.

Coming up next week: a spotlight on Team 2.

Production Operations' Team 1 staff, from the left: Adam Newman, Barbara Carbonaro, Jayasri Akella, Grace Chik, Rose Militello, Patricia Mayhew, Robyn Van Pelt, Barbara Rupp, Joanne McFadden, John Bogan, Joan Summerfold, and Janet Andreocci. Not pictured are: Florence Brzozowski, Vera Langstone, Donna Yablonski, and Lori Kenney.

We invite your feedback to this newsletter via e-mail to aipmatters@aip.org.

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